Urological Cancer Pathology Project

This project is committed to developing a systematic second opinion pathology pathway for the diagnosis of rare Renal and Testicular cancer.

Background

The project commenced in July 2010 with the view to reducing variation in care and improving cancer outcomes for the better management of patients.

Two uncommonly occurring urological cancers, Renal and Testicular cancer, were chosen as a pilot to enhance work already being done with the clinicopathological database (ACCORD) linked to the state-wide research database (BioGrid) and the development of synoptic reporting (Australian College of Pathologists).

Aim

This is a partnership project between three Victorian Integrated Cancer Services (ICS) Hume RICS, North East Melbourne Integrated cancer Service (NEMICS) and Western Central Melbourne Integrated Cancer Service (WCMICS) and aims to establish a demonstration model by linking regional and expert pathologists in these regions to assist in the diagnosis of renal and testicular cancer.

Method

A "Renal & Testicular Tumour Pathology Reporting Group" has been formed with Pathology experts who have developed an integrated system for the transfer, review and reporting of these specimens.

It is anticipated that this will improve (for the expected 75-100 patients over the time of this project) better access to high quality care and facilitate the routine second opinion review for pathological diagnosis of these rare cancers.

Potential outcomes

  • Reduced variation of care, improved care coordination and improved outcomes for patients with a low/rare volume cancer.
  • Enhancement of clinical and translational research.
  • Enhancement of existing ICS resources.
  • The development of a sustainable model for the routine review of other low volume and rare cancers that could be managed within a state-wide network.
  • A system to support the professional development of regional pathologists.

Related files

The project commenced in July 2010 with the view to reducing variation in care and improving cancer outcomes for the better management of patients.

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